4-27-17
  With warmer weather and sunnier skies comes the temptation for both humans and felines to bask in its welcome arrival. And that means windows thrown open and doors left ajar.
But for cat owners living in buildings of two stories and more – beware. Why? Because lurking in the light is a dark threat that’s commonly called High Rise Syndrome.   High Rise Syndrome describes the phenomenon of cats falling from heights greater than two stories (23-30 feet)) and refers as well to the injuries they sustain from just such falls.
The Hazards of Heights by Nomi Berger
Kitties usually find themselves in this predicament after being startled from their perch – whether it’s on a window ledge, a rooftop patio or a fire escape – and when they fall, they often suffer injuries more extensive than mere broken bones, especially from heights between two and seven stories. These injuries include bruising to their heart and lungs, fractures of their lower jaw and the roof of their mouth, swelling of their brain, ruptures of their urinary bladder, internal bleeding, and fractures of their ribs.
Surprisingly, many cats falling from heights that exceed seven stories sustain fewer and less severe injuries, thanks to their flexibility and their ability to right their bodies and relax as they fall. But for those less fortunate felines, the cost of treating severe High Rise Syndrome is high (ranging from $2,000 to $5,000) and the process of their being rehabilitated and restored to health is long and painful. Depending on the severity of their injuries, these poor pets need true intensive care, requiring a lengthy hospital stay that can include anything from supplemental oxygen therapy and temporary feeding tubes to one or more surgical procedures.
Since, according to the axiom, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”,  there are several, simple ways for responsible cat guardians to stop this scenario before it starts. Install well-fitting and secure window screens on any windows you intend to leave open. Whenever possible, open the top section of your windows instead of the bottom. Close every window before leaving your home and before starting such loud appliances as the vacuum cleaner. Don’t allow your cat to remain on a balcony unobserved, and never allow her to jump onto the railings. If you have a patio, move all furniture away from the railings to help keep her from using the back of a chair or the top of a table as a perch. If, despite your precautions and best intentions, your kitty does fall, bring her to your veterinarian or to the closest emergency clinic immediately for assessment. Because the injuries she may have sustained aren’t likely to be apparent to you, “at home” treatment is NOT an option, and she may be in both shock and extreme pain.
Then, paws crossed, all will be well, and she’ll have another eight lives to live, love and enjoy with you.
THANK YOU SO MUCH!!
Meet Callie
Little Callie is a leukemia positive kitty.
Callie came to us from our vets office.  Her owner had brought her in to be spayed.  When she tested leukemia positive  they asked that she be euthanized.  Thank goodness my vet will not kill a healthy cat that could have several more years to live. She is very sweet, gets along well with the other cats. You may watch her 24 hours a day live on her MeShare camera.   
A sad goodbye - RIP Carley
Sweet Carley came to us only a month ago from a severe hoarding situation.  She was also Leukemia positive.  Sadly she developed wet FIP.  FIP is Feline Infectious Peritonitis.  It is a  viral disease of cats caused by certain strains of a virus called the feline coronavirus.  Many cats come in contact with this virus, do not show any symptoms and an immune response occurs with the development of antibodies. In a small percentage (5 - 10 percent) infection developes into FIP. In cats that develop FIP, the symptoms can appear to be sudden since cats have an amazing ability to mask disease until they are in a crisis state.  Once symptoms develop, othen there is increasing severity over the course of a couple of weeks ending in death.  Generally these cats first develop nonspecific symptoms such as loss of appetite, weight loss, fever, depression.   In all the cases we have seen over the years, weight loss is always the symptom we see first. There are 2 major forms of FIP,  an effusive (wet) form and a noneffusive (dry) form. Dry FIP symptons generally include chronic weight loss, depression, animia and a persistent fever that does not respond to antibiotic therapy. The effusive form (wet) is characteried by a accumulation of fluid in the abdomen and less commonly in the chest. The wet form progresses rapidy. When it becomes excessive, it may become difficult for the cat to breath normally. FIP can be difficult to diagnose because each cat can display different symptoms that are similiar to those of many other diseases.  The only true way to definitively diagnose FIP is biopsy or examination of tissues at autopsy. Generally your vet may rely on a presumptive diagnosis based on symptoms, blood work, examination of fluid if it is present. Here is Carley’s Blood work - When I saw her blood work, I sadly was not surprised to see it develop into full blown FIP.  
Your generous donation of paw points have earned another pallet of litter for the cats!  Thank you so so much!! We use over 60 boxes each month, this pallet will be a huge help! Do You use your Paw Points? If you do not use your points, please consider donating them to the blind cats. Link to donate points ==>  http://ow.ly/lPoF302ojhP
High Protein, High Globulin, Low Albumin and an Alb/Glob ratio of .03 or lower has always ended up as FIP. There is currently no cure for FIP,  it is fatal.   There are some medicines that people try in desperation to save their cats. We have never found any that changes the final outcome.  There is a study that was done that has promise.  We talked to the doctor who did the trial before we euthanized Carley.  She said there is no more of the medicine available and currently there are no trials. A cure sadly is still several years out.
Thank you so much to everyone who came and visited the cats for open house!!
Thank you so much to our wonderful eBay sellers and buyers for sharing your auctions so generously with the cats!!!
We hope you will check out all their wonderful auctions  HERE    Your generosity this month raised $4213.13 !! Thank you so much!!! 
Do you do the daily click? Every time you click, they donate to the cats. You may donate once a day on each of your devices.   Click HERE  Your generosity raised $4700 for the last 4 months of clicking!  That pays lots of vet bills! Thank you so much for helping!
The cats need you!  Volunteers to help at the shelter and play with the cats.  Also needing board members. Please email Alana  alana@blindcatrescue.com   If you can help.
Thank you for reading!
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4-27-17
THANK YOU SO MUCH!!
Your generous donation of paw points have earned another pallet of litter for the cats!  Thank you so so much!! We use over 60 boxes each month, this pallet will be a huge help! Do You use your Paw Points? If you do not use your points, please consider donating them to the blind cats. Link to donate points ==>  http://ow.ly/lPoF302ojhP
Meet Callie
Callie came to us from our vets office.  Her owner had brought her in to be spayed.  When she tested leukemia positive  they asked that she be euthanized.  Thank goodness my vet will not kill a healthy cat that could have several more years to live. She is very sweet, gets along well with the other cats. You may watch her 24 hours a day live on her MeShare camera.   
A sad goodbye - RIP Carley
Sweet Carley came to us only a month ago from a severe hoarding situation.  She was also Leukemia positive.  Sadly she developed wet FIP.  FIP is Feline Infectious Peritonitis.  It is a  viral disease of cats caused by certain strains of a virus called the feline coronavirus.  Many cats come in contact with this virus, do not show any symptoms and an immune response occurs with the development of antibodies. In a small percentage (5 - 10 percent) infection developes into FIP. In cats that develop FIP, the symptoms can appear to be sudden since cats have an amazing ability to mask disease until they are in a crisis state.  Once symptoms develop, othen there is increasing severity over the course of a couple of weeks ending in death.  Generally these cats first develop nonspecific symptoms such as loss of appetite, weight loss, fever, depression.   In all the cases we have seen over the years, weight loss is always the symptom we see first. There are 2 major forms of FIP,  an effusive (wet) form and a noneffusive (dry) form. Dry FIP symptons generally include chronic weight loss, depression, animia and a persistent fever that does not respond to antibiotic therapy. The effusive form (wet) is characteried by a accumulation of fluid in the abdomen and less commonly in the chest. The wet form progresses rapidy. When it becomes excessive, it may become difficult for the cat to breath normally. FIP can be difficult to diagnose because each cat can display different symptoms that are similar to those of many other diseases.  The only true way to definitively diagnose FIP is biopsy or examination of tissues at autopsy. Generally your vet may rely on a presumptive diagnosis based on symptoms, blood work, examination of fluid if it is present. Here is Carley’s Blood work - When I saw her blood work, I sadly was not surprised to see it develop into full blown FIP.  
High Protein, High Globulin, Low Albumin and an Alb/Glob ratio of .03 or lower has always ended up as FIP. There is currently no cure for FIP,  it is fatal.   There are some medicines that people try in desperation save their cats. We have never found any that changes the final outcome.  There is a study that was done that has promise.  We talked to the doctor who did the trial before we euthanized Carley.  She said there is no more of the medicine available and currently there are no trials. A cure sadly is still several years out.
Thank you so much to everyone who came and visited the cats for open house!!
Do you do the daily click? Every time you click, they donate to the cats. You may donate once a day on each of your devices.   Click HERE  Your generosity raised $4700 for the last 4 months of clicking!  That pays lots of vet bills!  Thank you so much for helping!
Thank you so much to our wonderful eBay sellers and buyers for sharing your auctions so generously with the cats!!!
The Hazards of Heights by Nomi Berger
  With warmer weather and sunnier skies comes the temptation for both humans and felines to bask in its welcome arrival. And that means windows thrown open and doors left ajar
But for cat owners living in buildings of two stories and more – beware. Why? Because lurking in the light is a dark threat that’s commonly called High Rise Syndrome.   High Rise Syndrome describes the phenomenon of cats falling from heights greater than two stories (23-30 feet)) and refers as well to the injuries they sustain from just such falls.
Kitties usually find themselves in this predicament after being startled from their perch – whether it’s on a window ledge, a rooftop patio or a fire escape – and when they fall, they often suffer injuries more extensive than mere broken bones, especially from heights between two and seven stories. These injuries include bruising to their heart and lungs, fractures of their lower jaw and the roof of their mouth, swelling of their brain, ruptures of their urinary bladder, internal bleeding, and fractures of their ribs.
Surprisingly, many cats falling from heights that exceed seven stories sustain fewer and less severe injuries, thanks to their flexibility and their ability to right their bodies and relax as they fall. But for those less fortunate felines, the cost of treating severe High Rise Syndrome is high (ranging from $2,000 to $5,000) and the process of their being rehabilitated and restored to health is long and painful. Depending on the severity of their injuries, these poor pets need true intensive care, requiring a lengthy hospital stay that can include anything from supplemental oxygen therapy and temporary feeding tubes to one or more surgical procedures.
Since, according to the axiom, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”,  there are several, simple ways for responsible cat guardians to stop this scenario before it starts. Install well-fitting and secure window screens on any windows you intend to leave open. Whenever possible, open the top section of your windows instead of the bottom. Close every window before leaving your home and before starting such loud appliances as the vacuum cleaner. Don’t allow your cat to remain on a balcony unobserved, and never allow her to jump onto the railings. If you have a patio, move all furniture away from the railings to help keep her from using the back of a chair or the top of a table as a perch. If, despite your precautions and best intentions, your kitty does fall, bring her to your veterinarian or to the closest emergency clinic immediately for assessment. Because the injuries she may have sustained aren’t likely to be apparent to you, “at home” treatment is NOT an option, and she may be in both shock and extreme pain.
Then, paws crossed, all will be well, and she’ll have another eight lives to live, love and enjoy with you.
The cats need you!  Volunteers to help at the shelter and play with the cats.  Also needing board members. Please email Alana  alana@blindcatrescue.com   If you can help.