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3/30/2018
Meet Mary Ann
Mary Ann is a sweet senior kitty who came to us from animal control in Tampa.  We contacted Davica in Florida who has flown several cats to us to see if she knew anyone who could help.  With in an hour the cat was sprung from the pound and 3 days later got on a plane with Davica (first class) to come to be with us. When she arrived she was not in good condition.  She was very thin  5 1/2 pounds (you could feel all of her bones.) She has some kidney issues, infection and hypertensive. 2 months later she also had become hyperthyroid. This poor old girl can not catch a break. She is also a polydactyl kitty,  lots of extra toes.
Her Pound picture,  she looks so much better now.
Now
What is a polydactyl cat you ask?
A polydactyl cat is a cat with a congenital physical anomaly called polydactyl that causes the cat to be born with more than the usual numbers of toes on one or more of its paws. 11 things you did not know about polydactyl cats by Laura Moss
Aren’t these toes adorable??
Most cats have 18 toes -5 on the front, 4 on the back. 1. Polydactyly is a genetic mutation. It is passed down through a dominant gene so if one parent is a polydactyl and the other has the normal amount of toes, there is a 40-50% chance their babies will also have extra toes. 2. The condition is usually harmless. Having extra toes isn’t unhealthy or detrimental in any way except that it can occasionally make trimming a cat’s nails more difficult. However,  there is also a genetic condition known as feline radial hypoplasia in which extra toes are common, but it can actually be disabling because it causes underdeveloped or twisted forelegs. NOTE,  Mary Ann has a twisted leg also so we have strong suspicion that she also has this. 3. Some polydactyl cats have “mittens.” “Mitten paws” occur when the extra toes are attached to the medial side of the cat’s paw, giving it a thumb-like appearance. Please click HERE to continue reading the article.
Hyperthyroid and your cat
You have rated us a top charity 3 years in row! Will you help us be awarded a fourth year in a row?  Just takes a minute :)   For you that have already rated us,  Thank you so much!!  
Please Rate us
Mary Ann,  being a senior cat,  has now become hyperthyroid.  It is really interesting how fast they can go from negative to positive.  2 months ago she tested negative.  She has gained zero weight in 2 months so we retested her.  Now she is very positive.  Usually we have the cats have isodine therapy but we do not feel her health is strong enough.  We have started her on medication for it. Hypothyroidism in cats is usually caused by over treatment of hyperthyroidism, a common condition in cats.  If your cat is losing weight but eating, rush to your vet and have them do blood work. For senior cats,  you should have them have a regular check up yearly and have your vet do a full senior blood panel.  Cats can develop problems and hide it.  Blood work will help your vet be able to better care for your cat. Here is an article Mandy Cooper did last year for us.  It tells you what the symptoms are and more.
Michelle Stehrenberger was the grand prize winner of a trip to BCR from our raffle. She and her friend Atasha came last week for their trip.  Here are a few pictures from their visit.
With her sponsor kitty Scotty
Atasha with Boone
You can’t visit without a cuddle with  Snicker
RIP Dominic
Little Dominic sadly developed FIP.  We said goodbye on 3/15/18 
Meet Stacy
Stacy was found trying to survive at a construction site. One of our sponsor’s was working on the site and took her to the local shelter in hopes that she would find a home.  He kept in close contact with them and said for her to not be euthanized, he would return and get her if needed.  When she test leukemia positive they were told that her time was coming to an end and other arrangements had to be made or she would be destroyed. Rick and Stacy (now you know how she got her name) reached out to us to see if we could help. Rick drove 5 hours to bring her to us. She is a very very sweet girl who has had a very rough life.  Sadly her health is not good,  she has some masses in her chest and abdomen and we do not expect her to have a long time with us.  Breaks our heart,  she is just so sweet!!
THANK YOU to our kind eBay Sellers and buyers who so generously help the cats!!  You may check out all the pawsome auctions here ==>   HERE
A cute video of Cookie - a leukemia positive kitty playing with a butterfly toy.
Thank you for reading!
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Meet Mary Ann
Mary Ann is a sweet senior kitty who came to us from animal control in Tampa.  We contacted Davica in Florida who has flown several cats to us to see if she knew anyone who could help.  With in an hour the cat was sprung from the pound and 3 days later got on a plane with Davica (first class) to come to be with us. When she arrived she was not in good condition.  She was very thin  5 1/2 pounds (you could feel all of her bones.) She has some kidney issues, infection and hypertensive. Two months later she also had become hyperthyroid. This poor old girl can not catch a break. She is also a polydactyl kitty,  lots of extra toes.
Her Pound picture,  she looks so much better now.
Now
What is a polydactyl cat you ask?
A polydactyl cat is a cat with a congenital physical anomaly called polydactyl that causes the cat to be born with more than the usual numbers of toes on one or more of its paws. 11 things you did not know about polydactyl cats    by Laura Moss
Most cats have 18 toes -5 on the front, 4 on the back. 1. Polydactyly is a genetic mutation. It is passed down through a dominant gene so if one parent is a polydactyl and the other has the normal amount of toes, there is a 40-50% chance their babies will also have extra toes. 2. The condition is usually harmless. Having extra toes isn’t unhealthy or detrimental in any way except that it can occasionally make trimming a cat’s nails more difficult. However,  there is also a genetic condition known as feline radial hypoplasia in which extra toes are common, but it can actually be disabling because it causes underdeveloped or twisted forelegs. NOTE,  Mary Ann has a twisted leg also so we have strong suspicion that she also has this. 3. Some polydactyl cats have “mittens.” “Mitten paws” occur when the extra toes are attached to the medial side of the cat’s paw, giving it a thumb-like appearance. Please click HERE to continue reading the article.
Please Rate us
You have rated us a top charity 3 years in row! Will you help us be awarded a fourth year in a row?  Just takes a minute :)   For you that have already rated us,  Thank you so much!!  
Meet Stacy
Stacy was found trying to survive at a construction site. One of our sponsor’s was working on the site and took her to the local shelter in hopes that she would find a home.  He kept in close contact with them and said for her to not be euthanized, he would return and get her if needed.  When she test leukemia positive they were told that her time was coming to an end and other arrangements had to be made or she would be destroyed. Rick and Stacy (now you know how she got her name) reached out to us to see if we could help. Rick drove 5 hours to bring her to us. She is a very very sweet girl who has had a very rough life.  Sadly her health is not good,  she has some masses in her chest and abdomen and we do not expect her to have a long time with us.  Breaks our heart,  she is just so sweet!!
Hyperthyroid and your cat
Mary Ann,  being a senior cat,  has now become hyperthyroid.  It is really interesting how fast they can go from negative to positive.  2 months ago she tested negative.  She has gained zero weight in 2 months so we retested her.  Now she is very positive.  Usually we have the cats have iodine therapy but we do not feel her health is strong enough.  We have started her on medication for it. Hypothyroidism in cats is usually caused by over treatment of hyperthyroidism, a common condition in cats.  If your cat is losing weight but eating, rush to your vet and have them do blood work. For senior cats,  you should have them have a regular check up yearly and have your vet do a full senior blood panel.  Cats can develop problems and hide it.  Blood work will help your vet be able to better care for your cat. Here is an article Mandy Cooper did last year for us.  It tells you what the symptoms are and more.
Michelle Stehrenberger was the grand prize winner of a trip to BCR from our raffle. She and her friend Atasha came last week for their trip.  Here are a few pictures from their visit.
With her sponsor kitty Scotty
Atasha with Boone
You can’t visit without a cuddle with  Snicker