Newsletter 3/24/2015
For you that follow us on Facebook,  you know that sadly Cheetah lost his fight for his life to FIP. His illness taught us new things about FIP that we did not know before, so his loss has helped educate us for the next kitty with wet FIP.   Sadly many vets are no real knowledgeable about FIP either because when they see them they are close to death.  We typically catch it much earlier than that. I actually had planned on taking Cheetah to the vet the day he spiked his fever.  I had taken a long look at him the night before while he was eating and saw the skinny hips and swollen belly.  The staff had mentioned he had diarrhea again, I remember running the medications he had been on for diarrhea through my mind and knew I was not looking at a wormy belly  (like you often see on puppies)  I remember saying to myself that he was going to FIP on us..  Some common symptoms to watch for...  Age,  more common under 2  or over 10  FELV are much higher risk Corona positive  (do not freak out on that, 90% of cats out there have actually been exposed to it)  Cats with a normal healthy immune system will process it and not get develop FIP unless something changes in their system.
Some may show mild upper respiratory infection or diarrhea at the start.  Then Fever that does not respond to antibiotics. Fluid in the abdominal cavity. Your vet will do blood panel on your cat. The white cells may be low, normal or high depending on how long the problem has been present.  (Cheetah was high) Red cell may be normal or low (anemia) Cheetah was anemic.   Protein will be high,  Globulin will be high (Cheetahs was normal, that was causing confusion)  X-rays will show fluid in the abdomen. IF it is Dry FIP that makes it even harder to diagnois,  Joy had dry FIP but we did not realize what we were dealing with until we did the necrospy, we had never seen dry FIP before..  Next time we will recognize it. The problem with FIP is it can mimic so many other diseases,  you as an owner can spend thousands of dollars trying to rule out every thing. We finally got  the results back from the FIP DNA test from Auburn University (FIP mRNA ) and it was positive.   There are questions of how accurate this test is,  if it gives false positives or negatives...   FIP is a horrible disease and there at this time is no cure. For DRY FIP there is a medication that some say is having a good result,  Polyprenyl Immunostimulant. I will tell you that we spent over $20,000 2 years ago on PI to try to help build up immune systems on the FELV cats.  Only 1 of them is still alive. I know the next time I am looking at a swollen belly of a cat with fluid,  the blood test is giving us strong reasons to suspect FIP, (the Albumin/ globulin ration is less than .04)  we are going to do 2 things,  Immediately have the mRNA test done, and immediately start the cat on steroids..  Steroids helps calm the inflammation.  It will NOT stop the disease,  it may buy you a few days. If the Albumin/globulin ratio is more than .08 something else is in play and the cat is going to Raleigh, they have the means to try to figure it out. The thing I found so painful about this was many people’s ignorant comments on Facebook that their cats lived 2, 7, 10, 18 years wtih FIP.  FIP is 10000% fatal. Their cats were probably FIV  (different letters, different disease)  or corona virus positive.
Carrot is a cute blind orange kitten playing with a toy
Carrot and I spent the day at the vet in Raleigh today He did well and is back home.  He will be back to running in his room in a few days.
Picture of Cheetah sitting on a blanket
Cheetah update
I am sorry that we are starting the newsletter with sadness.
Carrot
Sweet Jake, a black and white cat who looks like he is wearing a batman mask, sitting on a big yellow pillow
Jake
Jake is hanging in there.  He is still not eating well at all. He is on new medication, he just started on it.  He also has kidney disease.  I feel realistically our time with him is slowly coming to a close.  We are trying to love on him lots for the time he has with us.
Good News :)
Tournament of Tails banner - you can click it to go to vote
You guys did good  and we won our first round of the tournament.
This is a tournament style contest.  We will be playing our next round tomorrow on 3/25 You only have that 24 hours a day to vote CLICK  HERE TO VOTE TODAY
Picture of Snicker smiling,  you can click it to go to vote
If we win this round of the tournament we will go into the next level which will be played the week onf 3/30-4/1     It will be on Facebook,  please share on your social network :)
We have been asked what are we going to do with the Eagle Rare prize money.  Part of it is going to be used to start our Capital Building Fund.
Pepper is a cute blind blind kitty who is also FELV+. Laying on the floor next to toys,  You can click his picture to go to the donation page
When we started in 2005 we just wanted to help save the lives of blind cats that were automatically being killed in shelters with little chance of being adopted.  Fast forward 10 years later,  thanks to education, social media and Gwen Cooper’s book Homer’s Odyssey,  many blind cats are now finding homes. In 2011  we grew to be able to help FIV+ & FELV+ cats. These healthy loving cats are typically immediately killed at shelters or vets office because they test positive for these virus’s.
Sweet Wendy snuggling against Seths chest
Wendy is FELV+  She was rescued by a rescue in Miami Florida from animal control.  She came in as a stray. They knew she tested FELV+ and had exactly 3 days to live. She is ear tipped and very frail.  She had had a rough live before she came to us.
Journey and Liza cuddling together in a bed.
Journey came to us as a stray from Tennesee and Liza from Texas.  Both had no place to go, euthaniza was the only option looking at them if we had not had the space to take them.  They are 2 of our original 12 FELV+ cats.  They came to us when we opened building 2.
The new builidng will provide us the ability to save 12 more blind and 24 more FELV+ cats.  It will also have a quarantine room, exam room, our own lab and a part time vet coming to the shelter.  (This will save us thousands of dollars each year)  We will still have an outside vet that cats will go to if they are sick and the in PT vet is not in house. Will you help us make this possible?  Will you donate now? Click  HERE
Part of the prize money is being used to start an Endowment Fund.
An endowment fund is set up for a life time fund to provide for the cats.  The principal is not to be used.  Only part of the investment income is to be withdrawn each year to help fund projects for the cats.  The balance is left in the fund to continue growing to provide more for the cats in the future.
To donate to our endowment,  send your check toNCCF,  4601 Six Forks Road,  Suite 524,  RaleighNC  27609  USA. Please put that it is for theBlind Cat Rescue endowment.  Your donationis 100% tax deductible.   For stock gifts please contact John Hartley,  Director of Finance forthe delivery instructions.
Popcorn is a blind 3 legged cat who really had a rough time before she came to us. She was found laying in the road looking like a cat who had been hit by a car.  The person that found her was SHOCKED to see her raise her head. They immediately stoped and discovered that she had no eyes.  They knew they were in over their heads and started making phone calls.  That is how popcorn came to us.  Not only did she have to empty eye sockets she was covered with fleas and had a growth (tumor) in her ear.   We got her healthy, spayed, eyes closed turmor removed. Fast forward a year,  she is racing across the shelves we used to have chasing Nicky  (she is not overly fond of Nicky) and took a fall.  She broke her leg. The vet set her leg and put in a bone plate. Fast forward a few months later,  she is back on the shelves chasing Nicky and fell again.  (we do not have the shelves now)  she broke her same leg again above the bone plate.  The orthopedic vet said the only choice this time was to remove the leg.  She adjusted very quickly to not having a leg. 
Popcorn is a white blind kitty in this picture standing with 4 legs :)
Introducing to you to Popcorn
Popcorn laying in a white crown bed
A cute video of Popcorn,  she has a thing for shoes
Beautiful Meadow, a black cat with big eyes sitting in a bed.
Meadow (FIV+) Says here is an easy free way to help the cats,  take 2 seconds.  Just click the link and then click button and they will pay the cats. The money adds up.  So far this month you have clicked almost a months worth of dry food! Here is the link (click me)
A few ways to help the cats that are FREE!
Do you shop at Amazon?  If you use the link: http://smile.amazon.com  and pick Blind Cat Rescue the Amazon foundation will give us a donation each time you shop.
Do you shop through Schwans?  Their foundation will donate to the cats if you use our link: HERE 
Do you like to walk/jog?  Download the resqwalk app, pick BCR and they will donate tous for every mile you walk :)  apple and droids http://resqwalk.com
Thank you so much to all of our wonderful eBay sellers and buyers for their generosity!
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Thank you for reading!
Newsletter 3/24/2015
I am sorry that we are starting the newsletter with sadness.
Cheetah update
Picture of Cheetah sitting on a blanket
For you that follow us on Facebook,  you know that sadly Cheetah lost his fight for his life to FIP. His illness taught us new things about FIP that we did not know before, so his loss has helped educate us for the next kitty with wet FIP.   Sadly many vets are no real knowledgeable about FIP either because when they see them they are close to death.  We typically catch it much earlier than that. I actually had planned on taking Cheetah to the vet the day he spiked his fever.  I had taken a long look at him the night before while he was eating and saw the skinny hips and swollen belly.  The staff had mentioned he had diareaha again, I remember running the medications he had been on for diareaha through my mind and knew I was not looking at a wormy belly  (like you often see on puppies)  I remembersaying to myself that he was going to FIP on us..  Some common symptoms to watch for...  Age,  more common under 2  or over 10  FELV are much higher risk Corona positive  (do not freak out on that, 90% of cats out there have actually been exposed to it)  Cats with a normal healthy immune system will process it and not get develop FIP unless something changes in their system.
Some may show mild upper repiratory infection or diarrhea at the start.  Then Fever that does not respond to antibiotics. Fluid in the abdominal cavity. Your vet will do blood panel on your cat. The white cells may be low, normal or high depending on how long the problem has been present.  (Cheetah was high) Red cell may be normal or low (anemia) Cheetah was anemic.   Protein will be high,  Globulin will be high (Cheetahs was normal, that was causing confusion)  X-rays will show fluid in the abdomen. IF it is Dry FIP that makes it even harder to diagnois,  Joy had dry FIP but we did not realize what we were dealing with until we did the necrospy, we had never seen dry FIP before..  Next time we will recogize it. The problem with FIP is it can mimic so many other diseases,  you as an owner can spend thousands of dollars trying to rule out every thing. We finally got  the results back from the FIP DNA test from Auburn University (FIP mRNA ) and it was positive.   There are questions of how accurate this test is,  if it gives false positives or negatives...   FIP is a horrible disease and there at this time is no cure. For DRY FIP there is a medication that some say is having a good result,  Polyprenyl Immunostimulant. I will tell you that we spent over $20,000 2 years ago on PI to try to help build up immune systems on the FELV cats.  Only 1 of them is still alive. I know the next time I am looking at a swollen belly of a cat with fluid,  the blood test is giving us strong reasons to suspect FIP, (the Albumin/ globulin ration is less than .04)  we are going to do 2 things,  Immediately have the mRNA test done, and immediately start the cat on steroids..  Steroids helps calm the inflamation.  It will NOT stop the disease,  it may buy you a few days. If the Albumin/globulin ratio is more than .08 something else is in play and the cat is going to Raleigh, they have the means to try to figure it out. The thing I found so painful about this was many people’s ignorant comments on Facebook that their cats lived 2, 7, 10, 18 years wtih FIP.  FIP is 10000% fatal. Their cats were probably FIV  (different letters, different disease)  or coronoa virus positive.
Carrot
Carrot is a cute blind orange kitten playing with a toy
Carrot and I spent the day at the vet in Raleigh today
Sweet Jake, a black and white cat who looks like he is wearing a batman mask, sitting on a big yellow pillow
Jake is hanging in there.  He is still not eating well at all. He is on new medication, he just started on it.  He also has kidney disease.  I feel realistically our time with him is slowly coming to a close.  We are trying to love on him lots for the time he has with us.
Introducing to you to Popcorn
Popcorn is a white blind kitty in this picture standing with 4 legs :)
Popcorn is a blind 3 legged cat who really had a rough time before she came to us. She was found laying in the road looking like a cat who had been hit by a car.  The person that found her was SHOCKED to see her raise her head. They immediately stoped and discovered that she had no eyes.  They knew they were in over their heads and started making phone calls.  That is how popcorn came to us.  Not only did she have to empty eye sockets she was covered with fleas and had a growth (tumor) in her ear.   We got her healthy, spayed, eyes closed turmor removed. Fast forward a year,  she is racing across the shelves we used to have chasing Nicky  (she is not overly fond of Nicky) and took a fall.  She broke her leg. The vet set her leg and put in a bone plate. Fast forward a few months later,  she is back on the shelves chasing Nicky and fell again.  (we do not have the shelves now)  she broke her same leg again above the bone plate.  The orthopedic vet said the only choice this time was to remove the leg.  She adjusted very quickly to not having a leg. 
Popcorn laying in a white crown bed
Good News :)
Tournament of Tails banner - you can click it to go to vote Picture of Snicker smiling,  you can click it to go to vote
You guys did good  and we won our first round of the tournament.
This is a tournament style contest.  We will be playing our next round tomorrow on 3/25 You only have that 24 hours a day to vote CLICK  HERE TO VOTE TODAY
We have been asked what are we going to do with the Eagle Rare prize money.  Part of it is going to be used to start our Capital Building Fund.
Pepper is a cute blind blind kitty who is also FELV+. Laying on the floor next to toys,  You can click his picture to go to the donation page
The new builidng will provide us the ability to save 12 more blind and 24 more FELV+ cats.  It will also have a quarantine room, exam room, our own lab and a part time vet coming to the shelter.  (This will save us thousands of dollars each year)  We will still have an outside vet that cats will go to if they are sick and the in PT vet is not in house. Will you help us make this possible?  Will you donate now? Click  HERE
When we started in 2005 we just wanted to help save the lives of blind cats that were automatically being killed in shelters with little chance of being adopted.  Fast forward 10 years later,  thanks to education, social media and Gwen Cooper’s book Homer’s Odyssey,  many blind cats are now finding homes. In 2011  we grew to be able to help FIV+ & FELV+ cats. These healthy loving cats are typically immediately killed at shelters or vets office because they test positive for these virus’s.
Sweet Wendy snuggling against Seths chest
Wendy is FELV+  She was rescued by a rescue in Miami Florida from animal control.  She came in as a stray. They knew she tested FELV+ and had exactly 3 days to live. She is ear tipped and very frail.  She had had a rough live before she came to us.
Part of the prize money is being used to start an Endowment Fund.
An endowment fund is set up for a life time fund to provide for the cats.  The principal is not to be used.  Only part of the investment income is to be withdrawn each year to help fund projects for the cats.  The balance is left in the fund to continue growing to provide more for the cats in the future.
To donate to our endowment,  send your check toNCCF,  4601 Six Forks Road,  Suite 524,  RaleighNC  27609  USA. Please put that it is for theBlind Cat Rescue endowment.  Your donationis 100% tax deductible.   For stock gifts please contact John Hartley,  Director of Finance forthe delivery instructions.
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I ran out of room on the mobile page :( there is more on the desktop version Thanks for reading!!
He did well today,  he will be back in his room wheel running in a few days.